Last edited by Juramar
Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

8 edition of Greek Gods, Human Lives found in the catalog.

Greek Gods, Human Lives

What We Can Learn from Myths

by Mary Lefkowitz

  • 21 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval,
  • Myths & mythology,
  • History,
  • Sociology,
  • Ancient (Classical) Greek,
  • History: World,
  • Ancient Greece,
  • Ancient and Classical,
  • Folklore & Mythology - Mythology,
  • History / General,
  • General,
  • Mythology, Greek

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages304
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9628721M
    ISBN 100300101457
    ISBN 109780300101454


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Greek Gods, Human Lives by Mary Lefkowitz Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human. In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece.

Lefkowitz demonstrates that these Cited by:   The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to. The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece. Lefkowitz demonstrates that these 5/5(1).

GREEK GODS, HUMAN LIVES: What We Can Learn from Myths from Freud to Joseph Campbell plumbed Greek myths for their insights into human character, but.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece. Lefkowitz demonstrates that these stories, although endlessly entertaining, are never frivolous. The Greek myths - as told by Homer, Ovid, Virgil, and many others - /5. Greek Gods, Human Lives The Greeks learned about the gods from poetry written in the eighth and seventh centuries B.C., the most important and.

This book provides a bracing perspective of the Greek Gods, not as the worst of humanity, but as the best of the Cosmos.

Prof. Lefkowitz's brief recaps of the ancient tales allow us to quickly see the roles the Gods play in human affairs/5.

The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In GREEK GODS, HUMAN LIVES, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of.

GREEK GODS, HUMAN LIVES. What We Can Learn From Myths. By Mary Lefkowitz. Illustrated. New Haven: Yale University Press. $ Web rumor has it that ''Troy,'' Wolfgang Petersen's big-budget.

Get this from a library. Greek gods, human lives: what we can learn from myths. [Mary R Lefkowitz] -- "In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece. Lefkowitz demonstrates that the Greek myths, although endlessly.

The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human. In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to /5(45).

Apollo Belvedere, restored Roman copy of the Greek original attributed to Leochares, 4th century bc; in the Vatican Museum, Rome Alinari/Art Resource, New York. The twin brother of Artemis, Apollo was among the most important (read: feared) of the gods.

Son of Zeus, he disseminated the will of his divine compatriots through various means, notably oracles. Greek Gods, Human Lives. by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz. My thanks to all of you for taking time from your busy schedules to listen to me talk about my book Greek Gods, Human Lives.

Maybe I can tell you enough about it so that you won’t have to read it, but I’d love it if you did want to read it. I wrote the book because I think most of us have. The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece/5(46). The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece/5(6). Even though the gods display their characteristics much more drastically than humans do, the similarities are obvious.

In Rosenberg and Baker’s book, the Greek gods have many human characteristics such as vengeance, jealously, and love. An example of a human trait is that the Greek gods and goddess displayed excessive vengeance.

Even though the gods display their characteristics much more drastically than humans do, the similarities are obvious. In Rosenberg and Baker&#;s book, the Greek gods have many human characteristics such as vengeance, jealously, and love.

An example of a human trait is that the Greek gods and goddess displayed excessive vengeance. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

As a general, introductory book, then, Greek Gods, Human Lives has much to recommend it. Nevertheless, neither professional scholars nor students will find much of interest here, and it may be worth pointing out a few shortcomings which seem to detract from the book’s value even to.

Sources of myths: literary and archaeological The Homeric poems: the Iliad and the Odyssey. The 5th-century-bce Greek historian Herodotus remarked that Homer and Hesiod gave to the Olympian gods their familiar today would accept this literally. In the first book of the Iliad, the son of Zeus and Leto (Apollo, line 9) is as instantly identifiable to the Greek reader by his.

Mary Lefkowitz, Greek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn From Myths. New Haven: Yale University Press,Pp. xi, ISBN $   This book is compilation of various Greek/Roman myths. It describes the specific gods and goddess of Mount Olympus and shares a few stories related to these gods.

My 6th grade teacher used this book in our Greek history social studies unit/5. In the Distinguished Faculty Lecture during Wellesley's family weekend and in her new book, iGreek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn.

Lycurgus, Pericles, Solon, Nicias, Themistocles, Alcibiades, Cimon, Agesilaus, Alexander `I treat the narrative of the Lives as a kind of mirror The experience is like nothing so much as spending time in their company and living with them: I receive and welcome each of them in turn as my guest.' In the nine lives of this collection Plutarch introduces the reader to the major figures and 5/5(1).

Percy Jackson is your average teen guy who just happens to be the half-human son of the god Poseidon. Claiming that a publisher in New York asked him to give insights into the Greek gods, Percy tells.

Humans as Gods (Russian: Люди как боги, translit. Lyudi kak bogi) is a – science fiction trilogy by Soviet author Sergey e being initially intended as a parody on space opera, mythological and religious cliché, the novels embody a complex set of ideas on the fundamental principles of the world's structure and development, and the directions of the Author: Sergey Snegov.

Why. Greek Gods, Human Lives. Wednesday, we continue our series on why a loving God would let bad things happen with a look at The Book of Job. It's of course the story of a successful man who loses everything: his wealth, his children and his own health.

It's all the result of a contest between God and Satan, where God allows this. From the very beginning of The Iliad, it is clear that when the gods are offended by the actions of the humans, or when the gods favor one human over another, the humans' fates are sealed.

For. human beings: beautiful men and women, old people with humor and dignity, and splendidly natural animals (as well as a few monsters).

All the art and all the thought of Greece centered on human beings and human feelings. The Greek gods and goddesses usually interacted with humans in towns and. Greek mythology is the body of myths originally told by the ancient Greeks and a genre of Ancient Greek stories concern the origin and the nature of the world, the lives and activities of deities, heroes, and mythological creatures, and the origins and significance of the ancient Greeks' own cult and ritual practices.

Modern scholars study the myths in an attempt to shed light. The Greek gods sometimes personified ideas or events in human life that are difficult to understand, such as Death, Time, or Fate. Most Greek gods had similar characteristics, both good and bad, to human beings.

They were portrayed as men or women, but they were thought to be immortal and to hold special powers. The gods could exercise their File Size: KB. In the Greek Peloponnese, high atop the summit on Arcadia’s Mount Lykaion (Wolf Mountain) lies an altar at one of the oldest and most revered of all primordial sanctuaries.

Towering at nearly 5, feet (15 meters), with vistas of the entire Peloponnese peninsula below, it is easy to understand the intimacy the ancients must have felt towards the god of sky and thunder at this sacred.

The gods, heroes, and humans of Greek mythology were flawed. In addition to Zeus and Hera, there were many other major and minor gods in the Greek religion. At her birth, Athena, the goddess of wisdom, sprang directly from the head of Zeus. Hermes, who had winged feet, was the messenger of the gods and could fly anywhere with great speed.

Despite the rousing stories of male heroism in battles, the Trojan War transcended the activities of its human participants. For Homer, it was the gods who conducted and accounted for what happened. In the first part of this book, the authors find in Homer's Iliad material for exploring the everyday life of the Greek gods: what their bodies were made of and how they were nourished, the.

Western civilization. The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece. Paula Reimers; Greek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn From Myths.

By Mary Lefkowitz. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, pp. $, JournalAuthor: Paula Reimers. The role of gods in The Odyssey is strong; they are prevalent, existent forces that help shape the entire course of Odysseus’ destiny. They are not simply faceless deities to pray to – they are powerful, present beings that help change the course of Odysseus’ fate, either for good or ill.

“The Council of Gods” by Raphael () For most first-time readers of the Iliad, especially traditional college-age undergraduates, Homer’s epic poem is a sudden plunge into immerse oneself in the competitive violence at the heart of Ancient Greek honor culture; in the repetitive, gruesome descriptions of battle-field deaths; or in the appalling practice of taking.

After an introduction to how the Greek myths describe creation, readers meet the Titans, learn how they were defeated by the Olympians, and get profiles of the 12 major Greek gods and their various exploits, conquests, and origin stories.

Readers also learn a number of word origins -- such as "volcano" coming from "vulcanus"-- and plenty of tidbits such as why Greeks and Romans wore laurel 5/5. The title “ the human behavior of Gods in the Iliad” is somehow conflicting to me at that period as we look from the Bible point of view.

As mentioned in The Hebrew Bible, God created Adam and Eve and left them in a place with abundance of everything. The stories of the Greek gods have inspired human consciousness for more than thirty centuries, the outgrowth of a society in which homosexuality was an accepted aspect of human behavior.

Dating the Greek Gods explores these stories as well as the dominant characteristics of those Greek deities, tying the spirituality of being a gay male to the Released on: J The Arms of Hercules is the third book in the Book of the Gods book series.

The fantasy lives on. The third series introduces us to Hercules, son of Zeus and king of all the Greek gods. Hercules’ mother is human. She was so beautiful that she struck the heart of her husband, the great Greek god.Of all the Ancient Greek facts, their stories of the gods have to be one of the most fascinating!

Join National Geographic Kids as we meet some of them It was believed that the family of Greek gods lived in a cloud palace above Mount Olympus (the highest mountain in Greece). These gods were thought to have special powers, and each had control over a different aspect of life.